Monday, April 4, 2016

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? #IMWAYR 4/4/16


It's Monday! What are you reading? was started by Sheila at Book Journey and was adapted for children's books from picture books through YA by Jen of Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee of Unleashing Readers. You can visit either site for a round up of blogs sharing their weekly readings and thoughts or search Twitter for #IMWAYR.



Last Weeks' Posts

  • New Book Alert: Waylon! Sara Pennypacker may have ended her Clementine series but has launched a new series featuring another child in her class: Waylon, the science-obsessed now-fourth grader.
  • April on The Logonauts. This is a new feature I am trying out that highlights posts from previous years that were published during a given month. Check it out and let me know what you think! 

Follow The Logonauts on Facebook! I recently started a Facebook page for The Logonauts. Many parents and teachers are on Facebook, so it seemed like a great way to connect. Please consider "liking" to get updates via your Facebook feed, thanks!

Picture Books



Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation (2015) written by Edwidge Danticat and illustrated by Leslie Staub [A Charlotte Zolotow Hihgly Commended Book]. The book shares the story of a young girl whose mother from Haiti is being held in prison because she does not have the right papers. I am really looking forward to sharing this picture book with my students and having a serious conversation about illegal immigration and its impact on families.


Maya’s Blanket / La manta de Maya written by Monica Brown, illustrated by David Diaz, Spanish translation by Adriana Domínguez [A Charlotte Zolotow Hihgly Commended Book]. This charming bilingual picture book, based on a Jewish folktale, celebrates the love children have for beloved comfort objects. Maya's blanket keeps getting smaller and smaller as her Abuela helps her make it into other items.


Big Surprise for Little Card (2016) by Charise Mericle Harper and illustrated by Anna Raff. This is an adorable new story just in time for School Library Month. Little Card is waiting to find out what kind of card he will grow up to be, but when he gets sent to Birthday Card School by mistake, he ends up having to show up for his real job without the proper training. Good thing he quickly discovers the joys of being a library card! (A review copy of the book was provided by the Candlewick Best in Class mailing. All thoughts are my own.)


Beatrice Does Not Want To (2004) by Laura Numeroff and illustrated by Lynn Munsinger. Another great library title. Beatrice is dragged to the library by her brother, and she is less than thrilled. Her pouts and refusals get her through the first day, but the librarian eventually wins her over with a great story time. A good look at some of the many different services libraries provide. (A review copy of the book was provided by the Candlewick Best in Class mailing. All thoughts are my own.)

Middle Grade



Red: the true story of Red Riding Hood (available 4/12/2016) by Liesl Shurtliff. Red is the third "true story" of a fairy tale character, delving into the back story of Little Red Riding Hood, the wolf, her grandmother, and some other, intersecting tales. Though it is not necessary to have read either of the first two books in the series (Rump and Jack), there is some overlap in characters. This is a delightful and entertaining tale that many readers will enjoy! (I received a digital ARC through Net Galley. All thoughts are my own.)

Share a Post with the Diverse Children's Books Meme


The brand new Diverse Children's Books linkup is now live and will be posted the first and third Saturdays of each month. Come by and share a post about diverse, multicultural, inclusive (etc.) books geared towards children. Or just come by to find new book ideas!

Happy Reading!

13 comments:

  1. I am interested in reading Red since I like stories based on fairy and folk tales. I haven't had a chance yet though. Here is what I read last week. Happy reading!

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    1. The Sisters Grimm series and A Tale Dark and Grimm are two other great fairy tale take-off series!

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  2. A picture book about a library card makes me very happy indeed. :)

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  3. Mama's Nightingale sounds like such an important book - Thanks for telling us about it.

    Best
    Tammy and Clare

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    1. Agreed! So happy to have found this one.

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  4. I like that you and others have started this new meme, Katie. I'll try to contribute when I have something to share. Thanks for Mama's Nightingale, new to me. I enjoyed Red and the other Shurtliff books, very fun.

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    1. Thanks, Linda! I hope you do. I really hope it continues to encourage folks to read and review diverse books.

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  5. Cannot wait to take part in the Diversity Link Up!
    Love the idea of sharing old posts to get new viewership--I plan on pulling some my old reviews from my old blog for a feature during the summer, but I love the idea of posting about old posts. May I borrow this idea?!

    Happy reading this week :)

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    1. Absolutely, Kellee! Book blogs contain so much great "evergreen" content, that it seems sad for it to just waste away in archives. Can't wait to see yours!

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  6. I can't wait to read Red! Thanks again for your wonderful idea about the Diverse Books link up! So much excitement happening with this!

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    1. Thanks so much! I'm really excited to see where this linkup takes us!

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  7. I really loved Maya's Blanket and so did my students. I haven't read beyond Rump, but maybe I will catch up this summer.

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