Monday, May 2, 2016

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? #IMWAYR 5/2/16


It's Monday! What are you reading? was started by Sheila at Book Journey and was adapted for children's books from picture books through YA by Jen of Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee of Unleashing Readers. You can visit either site for a round up of blogs sharing their weekly readings and thoughts or search Twitter for #IMWAYR.



Last Weeks' Posts

  • Book Club: Walk Two Moons. This is one of my all-time favorite books, and it makes an excellent book for discussions. The post also includes major topics covered in the book and suggested page breakdowns.
  • May on the Logonauts. This is a new, monthly feature where I highlight posts published in a given month during previous years.

Picture Books



Where's the Elephant? (2016) by Barroux. This book puts an environmental twist on your average "seek-and-find" style of book. The elephant and his companions become easier and easier to find as their habitat diminishes. The author's note explains how he was inspired by the destruction of the Brazilian rain forest. So, then why an elephant? Maybe this is supposed to be a "universal" story, but there are no elephants in the Brazilian rain forest, plus these stylized trees look like a deciduous forest from the north woods of the US or Canada. Weird.

Young Adult



The Honest Truth (2015) by Dan Gemeinhart. I had heard many good things about this book, so I will admit to being disappointed. The character and his plight did not draw me in, nor could I understand his (or his friend's) justifications for their actions. A story like The Fault in Our Stars does so much to draw you into the characters and their impending cancers, but this story attempts to do that telling more in flashback, which seemed too little too late. I'd be interested in hearing from others who had more positive reactions.

Happy Reading!

19 comments:

  1. I've heard good things about The Honest Truth, but I haven't read it yet.

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  2. The Honest Truth is on my #mustreadin2016 book. I am a bit sad to see your reaction because I had high hopes for it (due to the fantastic reviews that I've heard). I will go into it open minded and hope that I like it more than you did! :)

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    1. I look forward to hearing your thoughts about it, Ricki!

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  3. It took me a long time to get to The Honest Truth. I don't know why I waited so long but I'm glad I finally got to it. So good!

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it, thanks Michele!

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  4. I enjoyed The Honest Truth very much, so it's interesting to hear your different reaction. We are all different & have varied responses I know. I just requested Where's The Elephant from my library. It looks fun!

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    1. My students got really into Where's The Elephant yesterday; I'm sure you'll enjoy it too!

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  5. I always appreciate honest book reviews, they're the most helpful, so thank you for sharing your thoughts!

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    1. Thanks, Jane. I love hearing when people disagree with a book I like/dislike too - it makes for great discussions!

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  6. I just bought The Honest Truth. Was planning to read aloud to my son but he REALLY struggles listening to books with a lot of flashback, so I might put that one off for a little while longer.

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    1. I just wish it had done more to develop the characters initially rather than trying to "explain" them later in the book.

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  7. I thought that The Honest Truth posed questions that are worth examining. As a character, Mark irritated the heck out of me, but I think that is ok. I think students will ponder what it might be like to be in Mark's situation. Is twelve old enough to decide how you want to die? Is it reasonable for adults to expect a kid to keep on going through treatment after treatment? I don't know the answers to these questions, but I'm thankful to Gemeinhart for creating a book wherein they can be asked, pondered, and discussed.

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    1. Excellent points, Cheriee! I wish the book had done more with the ambiguity of those questions too, then I really think it could have been powerful!

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  8. So good to hear different perspectives about The Honest Truth. It just goes to show you how important choice is when we help students select books. One book isn't right for everyone :)

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  9. I didn't particularly enjoy The Honest Truth as well - I have close family members and friends going through cancer, which makes the actions of the protagonist even more reprehensible to me.

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    1. Thanks for sharing, Myra. You raise an especially important point - how would a child actually in that situation (or with close family members) think about the cavalier attitude of the narrator?

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  10. I thought The Honest Truth was okay, but it didn't wow me like it did many others I know. Just a reminder that we all have different likes/dislikes and opinions and that's part of what makes book communities interesting.

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