Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Worldwide Cinderellas, Part 3: Fractured Fairy Tales

While versions of the Cinderella story are found around the world, authors have long had fun turning the tale on its head and creating their own unique (and often humorous) versions. Part 3 in this series on worldwide Cinderellas will introduce you to these fractured fairy tales. Part 1 covered Cinderella stories from Asia, Europe, and Africa, while Part 2 shared Cinderella stories from the Americas. The final post will explain how I teach Cinderella stories.


Glass Slipper, Gold Sandal: a worldwide Cinderella by Paul Fleishman and illustrated by Julie Paschkis. Not exactly a fractured fairytale, this meta-retelling of Cinderella involves the skillful weaving of a whole collection of cultural versions into one, giant version of the Cinderella story. The illustrations neatly support the merger with a variety of colors and folk art styles. This book makes a great ending to any study of Cinderella stories.


Fractured Cinderella Tales


Cinder Edna by Ellen Jackson and illustrated by Kevin O'Malley. In one of my all-time favorite Cinderella spin-offs, Cinder Edna is poor Cinderella's neighbor. Despite their similar evil step-mother situations, Cinder Edna has quite a different response than the original tale. A great reflection on what might make a true 'happily ever after.'


Cindy Ellen: a wild western Cinderella by Susan Lowell and illustrated by Jane Manning. Cindy Ellen has her heart set on attending the big rodeo in town but will need the help of her creative fairy godmother. The book also has an afterword with some background about the wild west and Annie Oakley.


Cinder-Elly by Frances Minters and illustrated by G. Brian Karas. This urban, New York City-dwelling Cinderella story seems to be showing its age. The rhymes are clunky, illustrations are an odd mix, and I don't understand why her family is mean to her or why, if she is too young to go to a basketball game, she is not too young to then date the main player. Odd. But, on the upside, you have a Cinderella with glass basketball sneakers.


Bubba the Cowboy Prince: a fractured Texas tale by Hellen Ketteman and illustrated by James Warhola. This fractured tale flips the Cinderella narrative's gender roles, and now it is young Bubba harassed by a step-father and step-brothers who wants to court the lovely Miz Lurleen. Plus, nothing beats a fairy godcow or a white horse that turns back into a cow at midnight.


Prince Cinders by Babette Cole. In this hilariously mixed up Cinderella tale, poor Prince Cinders finds himself visited by a fairy whose skills are not quite as promised!


Seriously, Cinderella is So Annoying! (The story of Cinderella as told by the Wicked Stepmother) by Tricia Speed Shaskan and illustrated by Gerald Guerlais. Finally, the "wicked" stepmother gets to tell her side of the story in this perspective-twisting rant.


Cinderella Skeleton by Robert San Souci and illustrated by David Catrow. This impressive, rhyming take on Cinderella features perhaps the most unlikeliest of heroines, Cinderella Skeleton. Despite the high spooky-factor, this one is always a big hit with my students (especially once they find out what Cinderella Skeleton loses after the ball, and it's not a shoe ...).


Dinorella: a prehistoric fairy tale by Pamela Duncan Edwards and illustrated by Henry Cole. This absurdist, alliterative angle on Cinderella will especially intrigue students with a fascination for the letter D. This one is not one of my favorites (way too forced) but is fascinatingly farcical enough for a fun fractured fairy tale.


Bigfoot Cinderrrrrella by Tony Johnson and illustrated by James Warhola. This humorous resetting of Cinderella features Bigfoot as the Prince and the woolly Rrrrrella as his Cinderella. A good laugh with some environmental reminders thrown in. (Plus, who wouldn't want to marry a gal who can beat you in a log roll?)


Roald Dahl's Revolting Rhymes by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. I just had to include this chock-full collection of fractured fairy tales. His dark take on Cinderella might be a bit much for younger readers but will delight those ready for some gruesome details (and inappropriate language).

Do you have favorite fractured Cinderella story? Please share any I have missed, as I love finding out about new stories. You can also check out part 1: Cinderella stories from Asia, Africa, and Europepart 2: Cinderella stories from the Americas, and part 4: Teaching Cinderella Stories.


Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday Challenge is hosted by Kid Lit Frenzy and is a weekly roundup of educator blogs that are sharing nonfiction picture books. Click the link to check out other nonfiction posts.

12 comments:

  1. I will pass these titles on to our first grade team. They are getting ready to do a comparisons unit, I know the first title they are using is Cinderella! Another one they are using is Cinder Hazel.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hmm, I don't know about Hazel, I will have to investigate. (You may not want to pass the Roald Dahl one along for first graders though ... )

      Delete
  2. This study is so much fun to do with students. Each story is a reflection of the culture from which it comes. Have you seen Baba Yaga and Vasilisa the Brave by Marianna Mayer illustrated by K. Y. Craft? Or The Gospel Cinderella by Joyce Carol Thomas illustrated by David Diaz? I also found an old title The Cinderella Story by Neil Philip to be helpful. Love these posts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! I didn't include Vasilisa just because there are so many differences in that one that it is more difficult for my third graders to analyze. I am not familiar with the Gospel Cinderella; will have to check that one out, thanks!

      Delete
  3. Bubba the Cowboy Prince is one of my favorites! I also love Fanny's Dream, but I believe it is out of print.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bubba is a pretty funny one, for sure!

      Delete
  4. This, again, is a great list, Katie. If you want an edgy poetic set of fractured fairy tales, only middle school & up, try Ron Koertge's Lies, Knives, & Other Girls In Red Dresses.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cool, thanks, Linda. May check that out when I need a laugh!

      Delete
  5. Hi there Katie, reading your post reminded me so much of our fractured fairy tale reading theme several years back, I'm not sure if I shared the link of our round-up post with you, but here it is: http://gatheringbooks.org/2011/12/28/list-of-fractured-fairy-tales/

    I see a few familiar titles here that we also featured previously and so many new amazing ones too! Glass Slipper and Gold Sandal in particular is one that I am intrigued to find in our libraries. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Myra! I will check your post out immediately. (We are doing a fractured fairy tale theme soon for plays, so we need inspiration.) I love, love, love Glass Slipper, Gold Sandal, especially after kids have read a few different stories and can see them all as one.

      Delete
  6. What a great resource! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Gigi! Glad you found it useful!

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...