Friday, November 4, 2016

Stonewall Book Awards: great children's LGBTQ books


The Stonewall Book Awards honors books for children or teens that show exceptional merit "relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender experience." It was first awarded in 1971 expanded to awards for children's and young adult literature in 2010. In this post, I will highlight some of my favorite books that have received a Stonewall award or honor. Click here for more about the Stonewall Book Awards, including all winners.

Stonewall Award Winners



This Day in June (2014) by Gayle E. Pitman and illustrated by Kristyna Litten. The brief poetic descriptions in this book detail different scenes in a pride parade with an extensive Reading Guide at the end explaining some of the background and history behind the different groups, organizations, and people represented. There is also a note to parents and caregivers about talking to children about LGBT and sexual orientation. The illustrations also do a great job of depicting a diversity of people.


George (2015) by Alex Gino. George is the story of a fourth grade child, born a boy named George, who is certain that she is a girl and would prefer to be called Melissa. The story follows both her inner and outer journey to see what it means to "Be who you are" in today's world. I think this is an important book in many respects and one that teachers, especially, should consider reading for a perspective/introduction to transgender issues.

Stonewall Honor Books



Better Nate than Ever (2013) by Tim Federle. This charming debut chapter book stars wanna-be actor Nate Foster who runs away from home in Pennsylvania to a Broadway audition in New York City. Packed with theatrical and musical references, this humorous story will delight readers, while also helping build empathy and celebrate differences. There is also a great sequel, Five, Six, Seven, Nate! (I listened to this one on audiobook, narrated by the author, which I highly recommend.)


Drama (2012) by Raina Telgemeier. This realistic-fiction graphic novel focuses on seventh-grader Cassie, and the drama of the title refers both to her interests in theater set design as well as the kinds of drama one expects in middle school - issues with friends and relationships. Drama has made the ALA's 2014 list of the Top 10 Most-Challenged Books in the US because of its inclusion of gay characters and relationships. (You can read more about how I celebrated Banned Books Week in my classroom here.) I am delighted to have a signed copy of this book to add to my classroom library (thank you, #nErDcampMI!).

DiverseKidLit

Shared with #DiverseKidLit

What are your favorite books that feature lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender, and/or queer characters?Please share in the comments below. (To see a compilation of many diverse book awards, please read Spotlight on Diverse Book Awards or click on the Award-Winning Books tag.)



11 comments:

  1. This is a wonderful resource. We desperately need quality books that deal with difficult subjects.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Absolutely! And hopefully books like these might help make those subjects feel less "difficult" for the kids that experience them.

      Delete
  2. I have read all three of these novels, and loved them all especially GEORGE. I also bought them for our school library.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Joanna. I booktalked George during Banned Book Week, and several kids immediately HAD to read it. One was even late returning it because her mom also wanted to read it.

      Delete
  3. I love ALL of these books so very much. I really love the fact that we're finally starting to get a bit more diversity of theme and tone in LGBTQ books - while we still need coming-out stories and darker stories, there is such a need for positive, uplifting stories, as well as stories in which being LGBTQ is just a reality, rather than the sole focus of the story. Thank you for sharing these!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly, Jane. It's like one of my #pb10for10 booklists where I wanted to feature books that were diverse but weren't only about civil rights or inequality. You said it perfectly.

      Delete
  4. I've enjoyed all of these. I also love Morris Micklewhite (picture book), Aristotle and Dante (teen), and Mommy, Mama and Me & Daddy, Papa and Me by Newman (board books). One that didn't get a Stonewall, but I also really enjoyed was The Marvels.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Crystal. I adored The Marvels too, as well as Morris Micklewhite (must have skipped over in the list). I listened to Aristotle and Dante as a book on tape, which really slowed it down for me. I think I might have liked it more at my reading pace.

      Delete
  5. Thank you for highlighting these - Jane's response says it all!

    ReplyDelete
  6. View here some cool tips for students and writers.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...