Thursday, May 26, 2016

#3rdfor3rd: The Spiderwick Chronicles

Welcome to #3rdfor3rd where I share books that my third graders recommend for other third graders. (Please note that my third graders read a wide variety of books across a wide variety of genres, levels, and topics. Do not think that these books are "only" for third graders.) Read more about this book recommendation series and format here.

The Spiderwick Chronicles


Book recommendation by Elsa: The Spiderwick Chronicles

Join the Grace children as they discover a secret world of magic and mystery. It all starts when Jared Grace finds a hidden library. Once they've figured out about the world the faries a determained to stop them.

The author is Tony Diztelleri and the world is yours to discover but beware the world may be closer than it seems.

A quote from the 3rd book is " I suppose you're on her side too."

It is a secret world so discover it!

Click here or the #3rdfor3rd tag for more great book recommendations!

Monday, May 23, 2016

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? #IMWAYR 5/23/16


It's Monday! What are you reading? was started by Sheila at Book Journey and was adapted for children's books from picture books through YA by Jen of Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee of Unleashing Readers. You can visit either site for a round up of blogs sharing their weekly readings and thoughts or search Twitter for #IMWAYR.



Last Weeks' Posts

  • Welcome to Diverse Children's Book Linkup! There's an all-new #diversekidlit up, featuring books for children that showcase the diversity of our world. My latest link up post features a review of the newest Family Fletcher book!
  • #3rdfor3rd: Trouble Magnet. The George Brown, Class Clown series is popular with my third graders. Read this review to find out why!
  • May Kid Lit Blog Hop. Join this month's Kid Lit Blog Hop to share and discover great posts about all kinds of children's literature.

Picture Books



Violet and Victor Write the Most Fabulous Fairy Tale (2016) by Alice Kuipers and illustrated by Bethanie Murguia. In this follow-up story about story-writing, Violet is trying to write a fabulous fairy tale, while pragmatic Victor keeps interjecting his own changes. These are fun books to use with students to talk about the writing process as well as how group writing projects might work.

I read a lot more this week but will catch up next time. Home ownership + beautiful weather = entire weekend of backbreaking garden labor!

Young Adult


Thank you so much to all of you who expressed support and ideas for my move up to seventh grade. I look forward to following up with you once the madness of the last days of school winds down, and I can properly start thinking ahead about the fall!

Happy Reading!

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Welcome to Diverse Children's Books! #diversekidlit

Diverse Children's Books is a brand new book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children's books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

We hope this community will grow into a great resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, June 4th and will continue on the first and third Saturdays of each month.

Most Clicked Post from Last Time



The most clicked post from our previous #diversekidlit is I Am J - Diversity Book Recommendation by Joanna at Miss Marple's Musings. The post provides a detailed review of this Young Adult novel about a boy born as a girl who is wrestling with his identity and place in the world. The post also includes a link to additional genderqueer/non-binary resources.

My #DiverseKidLit Shout-Out



Earlier this month the highly-anticipated (at least in my classroom) sequel to The Misadventures of the Family Fletcher arrived! We had read the first book as a class read aloud in preparation for our Skype visit with Dana Alison Levy on World Read Aloud Day. The series features a family of four boys (Sam, Jax, Eli, and Frog) adopted by their two fathers (Dad and Papa). Sam and Eli are Caucasian, Jax is African-American, and Frog is Indian-American. Papa is Jewish, and Dad is Caucasian and Episcopalian.

The Family Fletcher Takes Rock Island picks up shortly where the first book left off: summer vacation. As the family begins their annual trip to Rock Island, "The place where time stands still," they find disconcerting changes are afoot. This is a great, humorous summer and family adventure series in the style of Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing or The Penderwicks. This book will make a great addition to any home or classroom library!

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted By:

Katie @ The Logonauts
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Beth @ Pages and Margins
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Gayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Marjorie @ Mirrors Windows Doors
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Mia @ Pragmatic Mom
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Myra @ Gathering Books
Blog / Twitter / Facebook


Guest Host for May

Shoumi Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live?

Receive an email reminder for each new #diversekidlit linkup





Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)




Friday, May 20, 2016

Poetry Mentor Text: The Desert is My Mother


The Desert is My Mother / El Desierto Es Mi Madre (1994) by Pat Mora and illustrated by Daniel Lechon. This poem-in-a-picture book would be a wonderful choice as a mentor text for writing poetry about places. Each two-page spread follows the same repeating pattern:

I say ...
She ...

For example, the opening line is "I say feed me. / She serves red prickly pear on a spiked cactus." (In Spanish, "Le digo, dame de comer. / Me sirve rojas tunas en nopal espinoso.")

This simple structure would be easily adaptable for a wide range of ages and purposes. Students could write about a favorite place or a researched region, for starters.

I also appreciate that the author chose to include the full text of the poem one a single page at the back of the book (in both English and Spanish).

Do you have favorite mentor texts for teaching poetry?

Margaret has this week's Poetry Friday roundup at Reflections on the Teche.

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

#3rdfor3rd: Trouble Magnet

Welcome to #3rdfor3rd where I share books that my third graders recommend for other third graders. (Please note that my third graders read a wide variety of books across a wide variety of genres, levels, and topics. Do not think that these books are "only" for third graders.) Read more about this book recommendation series and format here.

Trouble Magnet

Book recommendation by Davi

Trouble Magnet is a good book by Nancy Krulik. It is the second book in the George Brown, Class Clown series. It's about George Brown, who has this super-burp that makes him go crazy. He joins a band called the runny noses.

But in the middle of the band concert in the Edith B. Sugarman school talent show, he gets a super-burp. George goes crazy and plays on his toes. He even dive-bombs into the principal. Uh Oh, how will he get out of this one . . .

Other good books in the George Brown, Class Clown Series are:

Super Burb! (Book 1)

What's Black and White and Stinks All Over? (Book 4)

Attack of the Tighty Whities (Book 7)

And many more.

Goodbye!

Click here or the #3rdfor3rd tag for more great book recommendations!

May's Kid Lit Blog Hop!


Hello! Welcome to the May 2016 Kid Lit Blog Hop. This exciting, monthly hop is where we develop an engaged group of people who love everything that has to do with children's literature. Everyone is welcome to join us: bloggers, authors, publicist, and publishers!

Simply make a post and add it to the linky. (Please make sure to add your direct post only.) If you are an author, feel free just to link to your blog.

Once you are done, then hop around to visit others. Please follow the co-hosts and visit at least the two people above your link. Please leave a comment when you do visit; we all like those. Also, it would be appreciated if you grab the Kid Lit Blog Hop Badge and display it on your blog and/or your post.

We would also be grateful if you tweet about the blog hop too: #KidLitBlogHop. Let’s grow this wonderful community.

Our next hop will be June 15, 2016. The hostess will be around to see you soon.

Reading AuthorsHostess
Julie Grasso, Author/Blogger
Cheryl Carpinello, Author/Blogger
BeachBoundBooks
Pragmatic Mom
The Logonauts
A Book Long Enough
Spark and Pook
Hits and Misses


Happy Hopping!

Link Up Below:





Monday, May 16, 2016

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? #IMWAYR 05/16/16


It's Monday! What are you reading? was started by Sheila at Book Journey and was adapted for children's books from picture books through YA by Jen of Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee of Unleashing Readers. You can visit either site for a round up of blogs sharing their weekly readings and thoughts or search Twitter for #IMWAYR.



Last Weeks' Posts

  • Featured Illustrator: Demi, part 1: biographies. Our featured illustrator for May is Demi! Her artwork is simply stunning, and she has written an incredible series of books about the lives of famous historical and religious figures, which are highlighted in this first post.
  • #3rdfor3rd: Dragon Masters series. One of my students wrote a series of book reviews about several of the first books in the Dragon Masters series. His cliffhanger questions will leave you wanting to read them all!

Picture Books




Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation (2015) written by Edwidge Danticat and illustrated by Leslie Staub [A Charlotte Zolotow Hihgly Commended Book]. I posted about this book last month, but this week I read it aloud and discussed it with students. It was clear that they were deeply impacted by the story of this girl whose Haitian mother was in immigration prison for not having "the right papers." We also read the author's note and discussed the fact that many children and many families do not experience a happy ending like the one in the book.

Young Adult


The word is out now at my school that I will be moving on from third grade to sixth and seventh next year. It will be fun to catch up with some of my students from years past, but I also feel like I have a lot of catching up to do, book-wise! This age of kids seems to fall in a pretty steep book gap between older Middle Grade and younger Young Adult fiction. I would appreciate any and all suggestions for good books and resources to help bridge this gap!


Booked (2016) by Kwame Alexander. I had been eagerly anticipating Booked after finished The Crossover, a recent Newbery winner, and it did not disappoint. Booked is another novel-in-verse, this time told from the perspective of twelve-year old Nick Hall, an up-and-coming soccer star, plagued by his wordsmith father's book, Weird and Wonderful Words. The story touches many important issues and difficulties in tween/teenage life but without getting too heavy into more grownup content. I am excited to add both of these to my middle school classroom library!


All American Boys: a novel (2015) by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely [the winner of the first-ever Walter Award (formally, the Walter Dean Myers Award for Outstanding Children’s Literature) and a Coretta Scott King Honor book]. This is a hugely important book about the real pressures and fears of today's high school students, particularly students of color. The alternating perspectives in the two narrators allow both authors to explore complex issues from these two points of view. There are some more "adult" themes raised (underage drinking, unsupervised house parties) that some parents might object to, but at the same time others of these issues (racism, profiling, police brutality) are forced upon kids - even middle schoolers.


Enchanted Air: two cultures, two wings: a memoir (2015) by Margarita Engle [winner of the Pura Belpré Award and a finalist for the YALSA-ALA award for excellence in Young Adult nonfiction]. I got to hear Margarita Engle speak at last month's Charlotte Zolotow Awards when she received her medal for Drum Dream Girl.

The Social Studies curriculum for seventh grade focuses on Latin American history for the first semester, so I was eager to dive into this memoir-in-verse of growing up in Cuba during he 1950s and 60s. I enjoyed the book but even though it is told through her eyes as a child, I felt like much of the story was overly simplistic and lacked the depth of information and reference of Brown Girl Dreaming. I may use it as part of a memoir-focused book club where students have a range of books to choose from and discuss.

Happy Reading!