Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Latin America books - 7th grader reviews, part 2: Central and South America

This second post shares poster book reviews written by my seventh graders featuring books set in Central and South America and the Caribbean (excluding Cuba). Part one focused on books set in Cuba, Mexico, and the United States. Please click on any of the images to view them at full resolution.

Dominican Republic


Before We Were Free by Julia Alvarez



The Color of My Words by Lynn Joseph


Guatemala



Journey of Dreams by Marge Pellgrino


Honduras


Enrique's Journey: the true story of a boy determined to reunite with his mother (Young Adult edition) by Sonia Nazario


Unspecified Central American country


Finding Miracles by Julia Alvarez


Ecuador


The Queen of Water by Laura Resau and Maria Virginia Farinango


Chile


The Dreamer by Pam Munoz Ryan with illustrations by Peter Sis


Do you have any other favorite books from Latin America that would work well for middle schoolers? Please share in the comments below! (Click here if you missed part 1books set in Cuba, Mexico, and the United States.)

Monday, April 24, 2017

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? #IMWAYR 04/24/17


It's Monday! What are you reading? was started by Sheila at Book Journey and was adapted for children's books from picture books through YA by Jen of Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee of Unleashing Readers. You can visit either site for a round up of blogs sharing their weekly readings and thoughts or search Twitter for #IMWAYR.



Last 2 Week's Posts


Young Adult



All the Bright Places (2015) by Jennifer Niven. After winning the Young Adult category of March Book Madness, there has been much talk around this book in my room. (The only one of my students who has read it declared it the best book ever.)

At the top of the school's bell tower, Finch and Violet unexpectedly meet each other in the middle of their separate suicide attempts. What follows is a story in their two voices about how they both ended up in the tower as well as how they are drawn together following this experience. My main concern is that in certain ways the book romanticizes suicide (despite the author's best efforts to show its negative impacts on those left behind, as well as providing resources in the Author's Note for those seeking help). I'm conflicted about this one.


Saints (2013) by Gene Luen Yang. Saints is technically the second book in this two-book graphic novel set that tells the story of the Boxer Rebellion in China from two different sides of the conflict. This was a fascinating look at how individual folks become embroiled in wider conflicts and how small decisions and moments can change a life.

After our recent book discussion on American Born Chinese, I was overwhelmed by student requests for this book as well, so it may be some time before I get my hands on Boxers!

Happy Reading!

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

#KidLitBlogHop for April


Hello, welcome back to another month of terrific children's literature. We welcome you to the April 2017 Kid Lit Blog Hop. This hop takes place every 3rd Wednesday of the month. It is designed to engage a group of people who love everything that has to do with children's literature. Everyone is welcome to join us: bloggers, authors, publicist, and publishers!

Have you seen the Kid Lit Blog Hopper Facebook fan page? This page has all the news and information related to the hop plus ongoing posts, giveaways, news articles, etc. related to Kid's Lit. Check it out, and of course, please like the page.

So for our hop, please make sure that your posts are related to Children’s literature only and add it to the linky. (Please make sure to add your direct post only) If you are an author, feel free just to link to your blog. Once you are done, then hop around to visit others. Please follow the co-host and visit at least the one or two people above your link. Please leave a comment when you do visit, we all like those.

Also, it would be appreciated if you grab the Kid Lit Blog Hop Badge and display it on your blog and/or your post. Note: Make sure you have the newest badge as the old one goes to the wrong page.
We would also be grateful if you tweet and/or posted on Facebook about the blog hop. Let’s grow this wonderful community.

Thanks for sharing your great children's books with all of us! The hostess will be around to see you.

Reading AuthorsHost

The Bookshelf Gargoyle

BeachBoundBooks

Pragmatic Mom

The Logonauts

Cheryl Carpinello


Happy Hopping!

Link Up:


Please click here to visit the link-up.

Latin America books - 7th grader reviews, part 1: Cuba, Mexico, and US

My seventh graders recently wrapped up their Latin America unit of study in Social Studies. As part of the unit, our librarian and I put together a book list and had every student choose a book to read and review.

(We did a "book speed dating" session where everyone had a few minutes to look over a stack of 4-5 books before passing them on to their classmates. It was fun to see how much excitement - and possessiveness - was generated when they were choosing.)

For their presentations to the class, I asked them each to create poster (based on an advertisement from the latest Horn Book). Each poster contains a brief spoil-free teaser for the book as well as a description of the ideal reader. This first half focuses on books set in Cuba, Mexico, and the United States. Part two will feature books set in Central and South America.

(Click on any image to see the full-resolution version.)

Cuba





Enchanted Air: two cultures, two wings by Margarita Engle (memoir)


Cuba 15 by Nancy Osa





Cold War (From the US)


Countdown series by Deborah Wiles

United States


The Tequila Worm by Viola Canales

Mexico


The Lightning Queen by Laura Resau


Red Glass by Laura Resau

What the Moon Saw by Laura Resau



What are your favorite Latin America books for middle school? (Stay tuned for part 2 featuring books set in Central and South America.)

Saturday, April 15, 2017

#DiverseKidLit 1 Year Anniversary!

Our theme for #DiverseKidLit in April is Favorites. Please consider sharing diverse books and resources that support love and families. (As always, the theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

Thank you SO much to everyone who participated in Monday's #diversekidlit  Twitter chat! We had a wonderful conversation with a great community. If you weren't able to join us, you can catch up on all the posts you missed here.

What Is #DiverseKidLit?


Diverse Children's Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children's books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

We hope this community will grow into a great resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, May 6th and on the first and third Saturdays of every month.

Upcoming Theme


Our theme for the current month is Favorites. Themes are a suggestion only; all diverse book posts are welcome. If you're interested, you can start planning now ...
  • Next month's hops will take place on May 6th and 20th. Leave your ideas for a theme in the comments.

Most Clicked Post from Last Time



The most-clicked post from the previous #diversekidlit was Yash's review of A Walk on the Tundra, a charming new picture book about the Inuit. The book is also a celebration of Inuit life and of the special relationship between a grandmother and her granddaughter. There's even a study guide for educators!

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by:


Katie @ The Logonauts
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Carolina @ La Clase de Sra. DuFault
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Gayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Jane @ Rain City Librarian
Blog / Twitter / Instagram

Marjorie @ Mirrors Windows Doors
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Mia @ Pragmatic Mom
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Myra @ Gathering Books
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Shoumi Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries
Blog / Twitter / Facebook


Guest Hosts for April

Becky @ Franticmommmy
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Gauri @ Kitaab World
an online bookstore for South Asian children's books, toys and games
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / PinterestInstagram


Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live?

Receive an email reminder for each new #diversekidlit linkup





Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Get #DiverseKidLit Recommendations on Pinterest!


Our Pinterest board highlights a wide range of amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children's Books. Please consider following the board for even more great books!


Share Your Link Below




Wednesday, April 12, 2017

#DiverseKidLit Chat Transcript

DiverseKidLit

Thank you SO much to everyone who joined in for Monday's first-ever #diversekidlit Twitter chat! We had more than 500 tweets from over 30 participants! If you missed the fun - or want to look back at all the amazing ideas and suggestions, check out the Storify version of the chat below.


[I tried to slim it down a bit by eliminating retweets, thank yous, and so forth to get to the meat of the conversation and book recommendations. Tweets have also been re-arranged to try and keep answers to each question together - though I'm sure some were overlooked, sorry!]

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

#SOL Textbook AKR


Textbook Amy Krouse Rosenthal: not exactly a memoir (2016) by Amy Krouse Rosenthal.

In one section of AKR's amazing book, Textbook, she shares a story about a purple flower and asks readers to send in their own story about the moment right then, reading her story. This is mine:

I am reading your book on the couch. Thinking about history and how young you were when you died. Thinking about how much you already know when you wrote these sections, even though the rest of us wouldn't know until much later. As I finish the purple flower section, I pause. Reach for another bookmark to check out this section later. Just then, my cat looks up from her perch, makes eye contact, and jumps over. She's still figuring out how laps work and rarely gets into one of her own accord. She settles herself between my legs and starts purring. Loudly.