Saturday, August 17, 2019

Best Book List: Fantasy Favorites #BestBooks #iLoveMG

At the end of the year, I asked my fifth grade students to create their own Best Book List, themed however they wished. Click our Best Book tag for more lists or #iLoveMG for individual books recommended by my fifth graders. (Please note that my fifth graders read a wide variety of books across a wide variety of genres, levels, and topics. Do not think that these books are "only" for fifth graders.) Check out #3rdfor3rd for kid recommendations from when I taught third grade.

My Favorite Book List

Recommended by ER


  • Ready Player One is a futuristic book where everyone lives most of their lives in vr. There is a giant competition in the vr game and the whole world tries to win. This game makes a lot of troubles for the main character. (YA)
  • Amulet 1 through 8 are a great series of books. The main character finds an amulet that brings to many adventures. These books are very exciting and will take you many places.
  • Percy Jackson is a great low fantasy series where the main character is half god. Being half god is very hard for a young teenager. He and many of his friends go on many treacherous adventures.
  • Artemis Fowl is a good book if you like mystery. Artemis Fowl may seem like a good guy but he is not. He is an 11 year old criminal that never gets caught. In this book he finds out a lot about other species and uncovers secrets.
  • Savvy is a very good low fantasy book where one family has special powers. They might seem odd but really they’re just a regular family. The kids go on an adventure to see their dad in the hospital this book has many secrets.

Student-designed cover for Savvy

Click here for all of our Best Books posts or here for more great middle grade recommendations. What are your favorite fantasy books?

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

New Graphic Novel Alert: The Okay Witch


The Okay Witch is a new graphic novel by Emma Steinkellner debuting on September 3rd, 2019. (I received access to a digital ARC via Netgalley. All thoughts are my own.)

13-year old Moth has always felt like the odd one out in her small New England town, so finding out that she's actually a witch, descended from the hunted witches of the 1700s, is almost more of a relief than a worry. But unraveling the truth about her parentage and why her mother has been keeping her witch powers secret will take a little more digging.

Moth is an immediately engaging character to root for, and I love how the book wraps this story in the imagined history of a sleepy New England town and its connections to its darker history. There is a lot to be discovered here about how we understand our past, what lessons we choose to learn from it, and what divisions we continue to sow, as the angle of "witches" makes it easy for the reader to make connections to real-world racism, hatred, and discrimination.

Graphic novels continue to be among the hottest books in my classroom library, and I am sure this is another that I will likely never see on my shelf again, as it makes its way from reader to reader to reader!

Looking for more graphic novels?

Saturday, August 10, 2019

#pb10for10: Inclusive Picture Books for the First Weeks of School


Hooray! Today is August 10th, which means it is time for the annual Picture Books 10 for 10 event (#pb10for10). Teachers and educators are challenged to choose and share their 10 favorite picture books, thanks to Cathy of Reflect and Refine and Mandy of Enjoy and Embrace Learning.


Previous #pb10for10



10 Inclusive Picture Books for the First Weeks of School


I am not a strict #classroombookaday teacher (I only teach Reading four periods a week, plus we do several novel read alouds too), but I do love beginning the school year with picture books. This is my current round up for how we will be starting off fifth grade together, but these books would work for many ages!


I used Jabari Jumps last year as our first day of school book. (Thank you to Jess for this idea and fabulous post: How am I supposed to confront racism and white supremacy on the first day of school? Please, please read and deeply digest this post if you haven't.) The story of Jabari and the various ways he wrestles with his fear of the high dive serves as a great extended metaphor about facing your own fears and be willing to try new things. We also used the character of Jabari to discuss issues of identity and make a model "identity web" (below, inspired by Sara Ahmed's Being the Change). Students then used Jabari's web as a jumping off point for making their own personal webs. Below you can see last year's brainstormed list about characteristics of our own identities.



The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson is another great one for new beginnings (like the start of the school year). It touches on many overlapping elements with these other books - new schools, feeling like you don't belong, etc. - but also addresses the reader directly, which makes it more personal.


One Family (2015) by George Shannon and Blanca Gómez. This charming counting book is so much more. One is not just one, when it is a pair of shoes or a hand of cards. And one can be any number when it comes to "one family." This picture book is a celebration of families, in all their quirky uniqueness. The illustrated families include grandparents, mixed race couples, twins, single parents, young boys in Sikh turbans, gay couples, and so much more. This is great mentor text for a getting-to-know you activity, where each child could illustrate a page representing whatever number describes their "one family."


I'm New Here tells the story of the beginning of a new school year through the eyes of three children who are all recent immigrants to the US. It's a great book to get kids thinking about what it might be like to be new to a whole country and not just a new school. I also recommend reading the companion book, Someone New which revists the story from the perspective of the three kids already at the school who each reach out to welcome the new immigrant students. We had some great conversations last year around the ways that each character has to choose to take action and the impact it has.


In Alma and How She Got Her Name by Juana Martinez-Neal (a Caldecott honor), the titular Alma is frustrated by the length of her name, but her father patiently explains to her where each name came from and how each is connected to her family and her history. This one has a structure that would be easy for younger students to emulate when writing about their own names. My fifth graders will be researching and writing etymologies of their own names, so this book is a great inspiration.


Imagine
 by former US Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera and illustrated by Lauren Castillo is fantastic! The entire book is an invitation to the reader to imagine themselves through the life of the author and eventually to what they could accomplish in their own lives. With both my classes it took about halfway through the story before they suddenly started to realize that the author was sharing about himself. This realization made them especially excited and engaged for the rest of the read aloud. This is also a powerful immigration story. (Yuyi Morales' Dreamers would, of course, work well here, but I feel like Imagine is less well-known.)


Stella Brings the Family (2015) by Miriam B. Schiffer and illustrated by Holly Clifton-Brown. Stella faces a dilemma: who can she invite to her school's Mother's Day outing when she doesn't have a mother? Papa, Daddy, and her classmates help her realize what really matters in a family and how to celebrate all the types of families there are.


Benny enjoys a lot of things, but Benny Doesn't Like to be Hugged. This gentle, rhyming story by Zetta Elliott is told from the perspective of Benny's friend and gives readers insights in to how to better understand and appreciate kids with autism. My students and I had an incredible conversation last year about neurodiversity after reading this book, and it really helped them ask thoughtful questions.


When Aidan Became a Brother by Kyle Lukoff and illustrated by Kaylani Juanita is a timely story about family, love, and support. The story centers on Aidan, a biracial transgender boy, and his concerns about how best to welcome and support his soon-to-arrive baby sibling. Drawing on his own experiences feeling boxed in by his assigned gender at birth, Aidan wants to make sure the new baby feels accepted and appreciated right away. As a new parent, this book made me smile so much, as I have struggled to find clothes and toys for my 17-month old that aren't exclusively pink or blue. What a breath of fresh air!


Can I Touch Your Hair: poems of race, mistakes, and friendship by Charles Waters and Irene Latham and illustrated by Sean Qualls and Selina Alko. Last year we spent two days unpacking this one, as the poems make for a longer read than most picture books. It also has some heavy content that required some schema-building with my fifth graders: about police shootings, about Trayvon, about the N-word, and continuing our conversations about identity, prejudice, and stereotypes. So much growth and so many conversations were started with this book.

What are your favorite inclusive books for the first weeks of school? Please share in the comments below! (Looking for more #pb10for10? Check out #pb10for10 on Twitter or click the #pb10for10 tag to see my previous years' posts.)



Saturday, August 3, 2019

Best Book List: Personal Favorites #BestBooks #iLoveMG

At the end of the year, I asked my fifth grade students to create their own Best Book List, themed however they wished. Click our Best Book tag for more lists or #iLoveMG for individual books recommended by my fifth graders. (Please note that my fifth graders read a wide variety of books across a wide variety of genres, levels, and topics. Do not think that these books are "only" for fifth graders.) Check out #3rdfor3rd for kid recommendations from when I taught third grade.

Probably Every Book I Read in Fifth Grade that You Should Read!

Recommended by MT


Personal favorites:

  • The 12 Dares of Christa by Marissa Burt (Has sort of a Romantic genre, don’t read it if you don’t like Romance!)
  • Better Than Nate Ever by Tim Federle (Was my assigned book club book, however was slightly weird.)
  • Lemons by Melissa Savage (Katie has this in her library! SO GOOD!!!)
  • Rules of the Ruff by Heidi Lang (Super good for dog lovers!🐶)
  • The Doughnut Fix by Jessie Janowitz (Good book, and I’m pretty sure it’s in the school library)
  • Rules by Cynthia Lord (About an older girl, who’s brother has autism. Good book, in Katie’s library)
  • Ahimsa by Supriya Kelkar (A book club book, my favorite of them. In Katie’s library. READ IT!!!)
  • Vanderbeekers of 141st Street by Karina Yan Glaser (The first in the Vanderbeeker’s series. Amazing! In Katie’s library)
  • Vanderbeekers and the Hidden Garden by Karina Yan Glaser (Second in the Vanderbeeker’s series, also AMAZING)
  • The Truth about Martians by Melissa Savage (Another by Melissa Savage, really good. You should read it.)
  • The Sky at our Feet by Nadia Hashimi (Very touching, also saddish. If you haven’t read it, go do it. I think it’s in the school library)
  • Song for a Whale by Lynne Kelley (About a girl who is deaf, and sets out on a journey of a lifetime.)
  • Out of Left Field by Ellen Klages (About baseball and women’s rights. In school library)
  • The Amazing Magicians of Elephant County by Adam Perry
  • LION by Saroo Brierley
  • George by Alex Gino (About a transgender girl who still hasn’t told their mom how they feel)

Student-designed cover for Better Nate Than Ever

More good books:

  • Max Einstein by James Patterson and Chris Grabenstein
  • We are Party People by Leslie Margolis
  • Three Times Lucky by Sheila Turnage
  • The Simple Art of Flying by Cory Leonardo
  • The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise by Dan Gemeinhart
  • Into the Lion’s Den by Linda Fairstein
  • The Candymakers by Wendy Mass
  • Story Thieves by James Riley
  • Bloomability by Sharon Creech
  • The Wanderer by Sharon Creech


Click here for all of our Best Books posts or here for more great middle grade recommendations. What are your favorite fantasy books?

Saturday, July 27, 2019

Book Recommendation: Dragon Slippers #iLoveMG

Welcome to #iLoveMG where I share middle grade books that my fifth graders recommend. (Please note that my fifth graders read a wide variety of books across a wide variety of genres, levels, and topics. Do not think that these books are "only" for fifth graders.) Or check out #3rdfor3rd for recommendations from when I taught third grade.

Dragon Slippers

Recommended by IH


Do you like dragons? Do you like fantasy? Do you like embroidery? Do you like adventure? Do you like kingdoms? Do you like betrayal? Do you like cliffhangers? Do you like slippers?

If you answered “Yes” to all of these, then the book Dragon Slippers by Jessica Day George is right for you! ( ... due to this book being about dragons, fantasy, embroidery, adventure, kingdoms, betrayal, cliffhangers, and slippers.)

In this book, a girl named Creel gets sacrificed to a dragon by her aunt, who was hoping that a handsome noble would rescue her, slay the dragon, and pull the family out of poverty. That was the opposite of what happened, however.

The dragon ate her.

Just kidding! That would have made the book too short. Creel made friends with him, and in exchange for not ratting him out got to choose any pair of shoes from his collection. Instead of choosing the sandals or the brogues, she chose some exquisite light blue ones and set off for the capital of Feravel: The King’s Seat. Little did she know that choosing the exquisite light blue ones instead of the sandals or the brogues, also set off one of the biggest disasters in Feravelean history…

This book is great because it reveals what one of the biggest disasters in Feravelean history was. However, this book also uses cliffhangers, is quite funny in some parts, and has a wide variety of characters that almost anybody could relate to. I like how Jessica Day George got right to the point in some chapters, but also hid in a lot of description and really built up the plot. Due to all of this, I would give the book a 4.8 out of 5!

So go and read it!

Click here for all of our #iLoveMG posts. What are your favorite middle grade books?

Saturday, July 20, 2019

5 Books that were Disappointing

At the end of the year, I asked my fifth grade students to create their own Book List, themed however they wished. Click our Best Book tag for more lists or #iLoveMG for individual books recommended by my fifth graders. (Please note that my fifth graders read a wide variety of books across a wide variety of genres, levels, and topics. Do not think that these books are "only" for fifth graders.) Check out #3rdfor3rd for kid recommendations from when I taught third grade.

5 Books that were Disappointing

List by SN


Hatchet
Heart of a Samurai
Sign of the Beaver
Island of Blue Dolphins
Stone Fox

* Note: This list generated quite the discussion among the class - with both agreements and vehement disagreements! (All of these were books assigned by teachers in third through fifth grade - Hatchet was from me.)

Click here for all of our Best Books posts or here for more great middle grade recommendations. What are your favorite fantasy books?

Saturday, July 13, 2019

Book Recommendation: We're Not From Here #iLoveMG

Welcome to #iLoveMG where I share middle grade books that my fifth graders recommend. (Please note that my fifth graders read a wide variety of books across a wide variety of genres, levels, and topics. Do not think that these books are "only" for fifth graders.) Or check out #3rdfor3rd for recommendations from when I taught third grade.

We're Not From Here

Recommended by CG


Hi, this is We're Not From Here by Geoff Rodkey. This is a dystopia book. This book is about how humans destroy earth so now they're living on Mars. Then everything starts going wrong so then they have to go to Choom. The Choom government says they can come.

Twenty years later the humans arrive at Choom but now the Choom government does not like them all of a sudden. Read the book to find out what happens next.

This book is very good because it is humorous and it is always interesting. If you liked Ready Player One or Armada you will love this book. This is very good that you will love.

Click here for all of our #iLoveMG posts. What are your favorite middle grade books?

Saturday, July 6, 2019

Best Book List: Adventure and Mystery #bestbooks #iLoveMG

At the end of the year, I asked my fifth grade students to create their own Best Book List, themed however they wished. Click our Best Book tag for more lists or #iLoveMG for individual books recommended by my fifth graders. (Please note that my fifth graders read a wide variety of books across a wide variety of genres, levels, and topics. Do not think that these books are "only" for fifth graders.) Check out #3rdfor3rd for kid recommendations from when I taught third grade.

10+ books that have adventures and mysteries, and much more!

Recommended by AH


A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
Warrior series by Erin Hunter
Harlem Charade Natasha Tarpley
The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall
Harry Potter series by J.K Rowling
Whittington by Alan Armstrong
Inside out and Back again by Thanhha Lai
The One and Only Ivan by K.A Applegate
Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert C. O’Brien
Wishtree by K.A Applegate
Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, The Mysterious Howling by Maryrose Wood
Moo by Sharon Creech

Click here for all of our Best Books posts or here for more great middle grade recommendations. What are your favorite fantasy books?

Monday, July 1, 2019

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? #IMWAYR 07/01/19



It's Monday! What are you reading? was started by Sheila at Book Journey and was adapted for children's books from picture books through YA by Jen of Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee of Unleashing Readers. You can visit either site for a round up of blogs sharing their weekly readings and thoughts or search Twitter for #IMWAYR.



Recent Posts


I'm getting back into the blogging grove (or trying to)! I'm hoping to at least (re)commit to posting #IMWAYR posts once a a month, and I've been putting together book view and favorite book list posts that my fifth graders wrote this year.

Looking forward to a school year with no new preps (first time in over three years) and a sixteen-month old with a modicum of self-direction to give me a little space inside my own head. We'll see!

Middle Grade



The Bridge Home (2019) by Padma Venkatraman. This is the powerful story of two sisters, runaways to "the city" (Chennai, India), and the challenges they face there. The characters are immediately engaging and pull you into the story, and the writing is quick-paced and descriptive.


Blended (2019) by Sharon Draper. Sixth grade Isabella feels literally split in half by her divorced parents and her mixed-race heritage. This book draws you in and slowly builds in very thought-provoking subplots about divorce, racism, microaggressions, and even police shootings. Well-written, and I loved Isabella's voice and insights.

Young Adult / Adult



Laurie Halse Anderson's poetry memoir, Shout, is electric and a must-read.

Will I see any of you next week at Nerd Camp?

Happy Reading!

Saturday, June 29, 2019

Book Recommendation: The Mad Wolf's Daughter #iLoveMG

Welcome to #iLoveMG where I share middle grade books that my fifth graders recommend. (Please note that my fifth graders read a wide variety of books across a wide variety of genres, levels, and topics. Do not think that these books are "only" for fifth graders.) Or check out #3rdfor3rd for recommendations from when I taught third grade.

The Mad Wolf's Daughter

Recommended by LH


The Mad Wolf’s Daughter by Diane Magras, is a very good historical fiction book. It’s set in medieval times. Unlike most things in that time, the hero is a girl. The main character, Drest, has to save her family from being executed. She has five days to find them and save them before they are executed. She encounters friends and foes, twists and turns, and witches in the forest.

Can she save them? How far is she willing to go for her family? I give this book five stars.

Click here for all of our #iLoveMG posts. What are your favorite middle grade books?

Saturday, June 22, 2019

Best Book List: Awesome Books #bestbooks #iLoveMG

At the end of the year, I asked my fifth grade students to create their own Best Book List, themed however they wished. Click our Best Book tag for more lists or #iLoveMG for individual books recommended by my fifth graders. (Please note that my fifth graders read a wide variety of books across a wide variety of genres, levels, and topics. Do not think that these books are "only" for fifth graders.) Check out #3rdfor3rd for kid recommendations from when I taught third grade.

Some Fantasy Books and Other Awesome Books

Recommended by AG

 
Another student designed this cover for Ruby on the Outside

Land of Stories series by Chris Colfer
Gregor the Overlander #1 by Suzanne Collins
Ruby on the Outside by Nora Baskin
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
3 x Lucky by Sheila Turnage
Drama by Raina Telgemeier
Sisters by Raina Telgemeier
Smile by Raina Telgemeier
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Wish by Barbara O'Connor
Rain, Reign by Ann. M. Martin
Bloomability by Sharon Creech
Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech
The Giver by Lois Lowry
The Serpent Secret by Sayantani Dasgupta
The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate

Click here for all of our Best Books posts or here for more great middle grade recommendations. What are your favorite fantasy books?

Saturday, June 15, 2019

Book Recommendation: The Thief Lord #iLoveMG

Welcome to #iLoveMG where I share middle grade books that my fifth graders recommend. (Please note that my fifth graders read a wide variety of books across a wide variety of genres, levels, and topics. Do not think that these books are "only" for fifth graders.) Or check out #3rdfor3rd for recommendations from when I taught third grade.

The Thief Lord

Recommended by DG


The book The Thief Lord is a realistic fiction novel written by Cornelia Funke.

It takes place in Venice Italy. Prosper and Bo are runaways from their Aunt and Uncle, who's plans are to separate them, they seek refuge in a gang led by Scipio, who takes the name the Thief Lord. Prosper and Bo meet the rest of the gang, Hornet, Mosca, and Riccio, and they are welcomed into their secret hideout, an old run-down movie theater. But when a detective steps in trouble runs along their path. Secrets are unfurled, a friend is untrusted, and a chance that will change someone's life forever will take root in an all grand adventure.

This book is given adventure in a beautiful city, mysteries that twist the plot, and secrets that the reader is to find out. The characters are well-thought of and each have their own personality, which makes the book all more exciting. The writing in this book includes some Italian words, and a Glossary in the back defining each one.

"This is our…… home. The best home we've ever had. And he spoiled it all. And now he gets coffee as a reward?" is what Riccio had said when the gang was eating breakfast while talking about their "captured detective".

If you like a tiny bit of magic, mystery, a book with another language which you can learn from, and secrets to solve then you will love this book.

The Thief Lord is a great book for Middle Realistic Fiction to Teen Realistic Fiction which includes things that a reader would love to read. The reader is able to train their mind on thinking about what the characters look like. This book is one of the ones that should be on your must-read list!

Student-designed cover for The Thief Lord


Click here for all of our #iLoveMG posts. What are your favorite middle grade books?

Friday, January 25, 2019

It's Multicultural Children's Book Day!


Today is our 6th annual Multicultural Children’s Book Day, welcome!

I am thrilled to again be joining up with Multicultural Children's Book Day as a co-host and book reviewer. Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2019 (1/25/19) is in its 6th year and was founded by Valarie Budayr from Jump Into A Book and Mia Wenjen from PragmaticMom. Our mission is to raise awareness of the ongoing need to include kids’ books that celebrate diversity in homes and school bookshelves while also working diligently to get more of these types of books into the hands of young readers, parents, and educators.

Here’s how to celebrate:


  • Link up your diversity book reviews at the bottom of this post.
  • Join us tonight at our 6th annual Twitter Party! Follow @McChildsBookDay to join in on the diverse book discussions, discover new titles and authors and for a chance to win one of our twelve book bundles. Party time is 9 pm to 10 pm EST. RSVP here. Use hashtag: #ReadYourWorld.

We want to extend a huge THANK YOU to all of the Sponsors, Authors, Publishers, Organizations, Book Reviewers, Book Donators, Parents, Caregivers, Educators and Librarians who devote their time and energy to helping us to achieve our mission of getting multicultural children's and YA books into the hands of readers. We appreciate you!


Share Your Link Below


Inlinkz Link Party


Wednesday, January 23, 2019

MCBD Book Review: Someone New #ReadYourWorld


I am thrilled to again be joining up with Multicultural Children's Book Day as a co-host and book reviewer. Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2019 (1/25/19) is in its 6th year and was founded by Valarie Budayr from Jump Into A Book and Mia Wenjen from PragmaticMom. Our mission is to raise awareness of the ongoing need to include kids’ books that celebrate diversity in homes and school bookshelves while also working diligently to get more of these types of books into the hands of young readers, parents, and educators.

Someone New


I was asked to review Someone New by Anne Sibley O'Brien, published by Charlesbridge Press. All thoughts are my own.

Someone New by Anne Sibley O'Brien is a companion book to I'm New Here (read my review here) and revists the story from the perspective of the three kids already at the school who each reach out to welcome the new immigrant students. What I appreciate about Someone New is that it focuses attention on the individual choices that people have to make - to be friendly, to reach out, to take a risk on inviting someone on your team, etc. and how these small moments of courage can be so important for someone else.

I shared both of these books with my fifth graders at the beginning of the school year. We had some wonderful conversations around the ways that each character has to choose to take action and the impact it has. These books are great for building classroom community as well as encouraging kids to see themselves as part of the global community too. Strongly recommended.


Join us for Multicultural Children's Book Day - read on!

TWITTER PARTY Sponsored by Make A Way Media!


MCBD’s super-popular (and crazy-fun) annual Twitter Party will be held 1/25/19 at 9:00pm.E.S.T. TONS of prizes and book bundles will be given away during the party. GO HERE for more details.

FREE RESOURCES From MCBD


Free Multicultural Books for Teachers: https://wp.me/P5tVud-1H

Free Empathy Classroom Kit for Homeschoolers, Organizations, Librarians, and Educators: http://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com/teacher-classroom-empathy-kit/

MCBD 2019 is honored to have the following Medallion Sponsors on board

Medallion Level Sponsors

Honorary: Children’s Book CouncilThe Junior Library GuildTheConsciousKid.org.

Super Platinum: Make A Way Media

GOLD: Bharat BabiesCandlewick PressChickasaw Press, Juan Guerra and The Little Doctor / El doctorcitoKidLitTVLerner Publishing GroupPlum Street Press,

SILVER: Capstone PublishingCarole P. RomanAuthor Charlotte RiggleHuda EssaThe Pack-n-Go Girls,

BRONZE: Charlesbridge PublishingJudy Dodge CummingsAuthor Gwen JacksonKitaab WorldLanguage Lizard – Bilingual & Multicultural Resources in 50+ LanguagesLee & Low BooksMiranda Paul and Baptiste Paul, RedfinAuthor Gayle H. SwiftT.A. Debonis-Monkey King’s DaughterTimTimTom BooksLin ThomasSleeping Bear Press/Dow PhumirukVivian Kirkfield,

MCBD 2019 is honored to have the following Author Sponsors on board

Honorary: Julie FlettMehrdokht Amini,

Author Janet BallettaAuthor Kathleen BurkinshawAuthor Josh FunkChitra SoundarOne Globe Kids – Friendship StoriesSociosights Press and Almost a MinyanKaren LeggettAuthor Eugenia ChuCultureGroove BooksPhelicia Lang and Me On The PageL.L. WaltersAuthor Sarah StevensonAuthor Kimberly Gordon BiddleHayley BarrettSonia PanigrahAuthor Carolyn Wilhelm, Alva Sachs and Dancing DreidelsAuthor Susan BernardoMilind Makwana and A Day in the Life of a Hindu KidTara WilliamsVeronica AppletonAuthor Crystal BoweDr. Claudia MayAuthor/Illustrator Aram KimAuthor Sandra L. RichardsErin DealeyAuthor Sanya Whittaker GraggAuthor Elsa TakaokaEvelyn Sanchez-ToledoAnita BadhwarAuthor Sylvia LiuFeyi Fay AdventuresAuthor Ann MorrisAuthor Jacqueline JulesCeCe & Roxy BooksSandra Neil Wallace and Rich WallaceLEUYEN PHAMPadma VenkatramanPatricia Newman and Lightswitch LearningShoumi SenValerie Williams-Sanchez and Valorena Publishing, Traci SorellShereen RahmingBlythe StanfelChristina MatulaJulie RubiniPaula ChaseErin TwamleyAfsaneh MoradianClaudia SchwamLori DeMoniaTerri Birnbaum/ RealGirls RevolutionSoulful SydneyQueen Girls Publications, LLC

We’d like to also give a shout-out to MCBD’s impressive CoHost Team who not only hosts the book review link-up on celebration day, but who also works tirelessly to spread the word of this event. View our CoHosts HERE.

Co-Hosts and Global Co-Hosts

A Crafty ArabAgatha Rodi BooksAll Done MonkeyBarefoot MommyBiracial Bookworms, Books My Kids Read, Crafty Moms ShareColours of UsDiscovering the World Through My Son’s EyesDescendant of Poseidon ReadsEducators Spin on itGrowing Book by BookHere Wee Read, Joy Sun Bear/ Shearin LeeJump Into a BookImagination Soup, Jenny Ward’s Class, Kid World CitizenKristi’s Book NookThe LogonautsMama SmilesMiss Panda ChineseMulticultural Kid BlogsRaising Race Conscious ChildrenShoumi SenSpanish Playground

Hashtag: Don’t forget to connect with us on social media and be sure and look for/use our official hashtag #ReadYourWorld.

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

MCBD Book Review: The Turtle Ship #ReadYourWorld


I am thrilled to again be joining up with Multicultural Children's Book Day as a co-host and book reviewer. Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2019 (1/25/19) is in its 6th year and was founded by Valarie Budayr from Jump Into A Book and Mia Wenjen from PragmaticMom. Our mission is to raise awareness of the ongoing need to include kids’ books that celebrate diversity in homes and school bookshelves while also working diligently to get more of these types of books into the hands of young readers, parents, and educators.

The Turtle Ship



I was delighted to receive a review copy of The Turtle Ship courtesy of Lee & Low Books. All thoughts are my own.

The Turtle Ship is inspired by the true story of Korean Admiral Yi Sun-sin and his Turtle Ship, thought to be the earliest ironclad ship, predating the US Civil War era Monitor and the Merrimack by a few hundred years. Told in the style of a folktale, Sun-sin is presented as a young boy, whose friendship with a lowly turtle helps him discover the true strength and wisdom in a turtle's design.

This is a charming story, well-written and entertaining, and readers will love learning about the inventiveness of this time in history. The cut-paper collage for the illustrations is stunning and provides a great color pattern and dynamism for the story. I always appreciate a book with backmatter, and this one provides great details about what is known about the Turtle Ships as well as a bibliography and note from the author and illustrator.

I strongly recommend this book for classrooms, libraries, and families!

Interested in doing more for Multicultural Children's Book Day? Read on!

TWITTER PARTY Sponsored by Make A Way Media!


MCBD’s super-popular (and crazy-fun) annual Twitter Party will be held 1/25/19 at 9:00pm.E.S.T. TONS of prizes and book bundles will be given away during the party. GO HERE for more details.

FREE RESOURCES From MCBD


Free Multicultural Books for Teachers: https://wp.me/P5tVud-1H

Free Empathy Classroom Kit for Homeschoolers, Organizations, Librarians, and Educators: http://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com/teacher-classroom-empathy-kit/

MCBD 2019 is honored to have the following Medallion Sponsors on board

Medallion Level Sponsors

Honorary: Children’s Book CouncilThe Junior Library GuildTheConsciousKid.org.

Super Platinum: Make A Way Media

GOLD: Bharat BabiesCandlewick PressChickasaw Press, Juan Guerra and The Little Doctor / El doctorcitoKidLitTVLerner Publishing GroupPlum Street Press,

SILVER: Capstone PublishingCarole P. RomanAuthor Charlotte RiggleHuda EssaThe Pack-n-Go Girls,

BRONZE: Charlesbridge PublishingJudy Dodge CummingsAuthor Gwen JacksonKitaab WorldLanguage Lizard – Bilingual & Multicultural Resources in 50+ LanguagesLee & Low BooksMiranda Paul and Baptiste Paul, RedfinAuthor Gayle H. SwiftT.A. Debonis-Monkey King’s DaughterTimTimTom BooksLin ThomasSleeping Bear Press/Dow PhumirukVivian Kirkfield,

MCBD 2019 is honored to have the following Author Sponsors on board

Honorary: Julie FlettMehrdokht Amini,

Author Janet BallettaAuthor Kathleen BurkinshawAuthor Josh FunkChitra SoundarOne Globe Kids – Friendship StoriesSociosights Press and Almost a MinyanKaren LeggettAuthor Eugenia ChuCultureGroove BooksPhelicia Lang and Me On The PageL.L. WaltersAuthor Sarah StevensonAuthor Kimberly Gordon BiddleHayley BarrettSonia PanigrahAuthor Carolyn Wilhelm, Alva Sachs and Dancing DreidelsAuthor Susan BernardoMilind Makwana and A Day in the Life of a Hindu KidTara WilliamsVeronica AppletonAuthor Crystal BoweDr. Claudia MayAuthor/Illustrator Aram KimAuthor Sandra L. RichardsErin DealeyAuthor Sanya Whittaker GraggAuthor Elsa TakaokaEvelyn Sanchez-ToledoAnita BadhwarAuthor Sylvia LiuFeyi Fay AdventuresAuthor Ann MorrisAuthor Jacqueline JulesCeCe & Roxy BooksSandra Neil Wallace and Rich WallaceLEUYEN PHAMPadma VenkatramanPatricia Newman and Lightswitch LearningShoumi SenValerie Williams-Sanchez and Valorena Publishing, Traci SorellShereen RahmingBlythe StanfelChristina MatulaJulie RubiniPaula ChaseErin TwamleyAfsaneh MoradianClaudia SchwamLori DeMoniaTerri Birnbaum/ RealGirls RevolutionSoulful SydneyQueen Girls Publications, LLC

We’d like to also give a shout-out to MCBD’s impressive CoHost Team who not only hosts the book review link-up on celebration day, but who also works tirelessly to spread the word of this event. View our CoHosts HERE.

Co-Hosts and Global Co-Hosts

A Crafty ArabAgatha Rodi BooksAll Done MonkeyBarefoot MommyBiracial Bookworms, Books My Kids Read, Crafty Moms ShareColours of UsDiscovering the World Through My Son’s EyesDescendant of Poseidon ReadsEducators Spin on itGrowing Book by BookHere Wee Read, Joy Sun Bear/ Shearin LeeJump Into a BookImagination Soup, Jenny Ward’s Class, Kid World CitizenKristi’s Book NookThe LogonautsMama SmilesMiss Panda ChineseMulticultural Kid BlogsRaising Race Conscious ChildrenShoumi SenSpanish Playground

Hashtag: Don’t forget to connect with us on social media and be sure and look for/use our official hashtag #ReadYourWorld.